What determines the size of automobiles?

Are automobile sizes determined by external or internal forces? I posed the question a couple of years ago after visiting England. I happened to notice how many of the automobiles there remained much smaller than the American counterparts. I simply asked “Why?” After contemplating this question while on the airplane-ride home as well as over the following days and weeks, I determined that the difference in sizes of American and British automobiles may be due to the differences in the size of the land. While I am sure government regulation and safety standards play a heavy-handed role in determining the shape and size of our beloved means of transportation, surely geography and the the amount of vast space here in the US translated to the availability of larger automobiles. In this way, external or environmental forces become an important factor in determining the size and design of the automobile. Surely F-250s can’t possibly be sensible in downtown London.

Another point of consideration into figuring out why automobiles are the size they are would be that the people themselves are larger. Does this mean that Americans are larger, heavier, and unhealthy compared to Britain’s citizenry? And do car companies take national size averages into consideration when designing a vehicle? While I am sure the average citizen of Britain consumes less hamburgers than Joe or Sarah from Kentucky, the idea of average weight by nationality determining the size of the automobile in the respective nations may seem like a stretch. If it were the case, the sizes in cars are at least influenced slightly by internal forces: namely, Joe’s sizable gut inside the automobile.

 

What do you think? Let me know!

 

Drive Spiritedly.

-JRB

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The Perfect Car?

What is the perfect car? Is that car even made or has it ever been made? When thinking of what the ideal car would be, one must understand what they want in a car. I will admit, this is somewhat of a subjective question. But honestly, what really isn’t subjective in some form or another? For the ideal car, it must be reliable. After all, cars, as part of their essence, are tools and means to get from point A to point B and back again. Unless you are transient and continue onto point C. Reliability brings up, in my mind at least, manufactures like Honda, Toyota, Subaru, older Chevrolets and Fords, and Mercedes-Benz. Another criteria on the list would be safety. Fortunately, there are several agencies that will happily give you ratings on the safety of vehicles from all sorts of angles and tests. Economy is another important criteria. You don’t want to burn through your wallet/purse as you go to work only to fill that wallet or purse back up again for the return trip home.

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However, I think one of the more important qualities that often gets overlooked is excitement. I don’t think this quality is necessary for a car, but it is necessary for the perfect car. If you grab your keys, head out the door, and the car doesn’t at least provide a little satisfaction or excitement during the process of driving, then that car becomes something less. It becomes nothing more than the terrible, unwieldy hammer in your workshop: a tool. Perhaps excitement is a luxury. However, this is your perfect car, and life is too short to not have some excitement even if it is on your daily commute. The great thing is that excitement in the automotive world comes in all shapes, sizes, and price ranges – you can have the reliability, the economy, and the safety while also having the excitement.

What is your perfect car? Please comment below! Don’t forget to follow and subscribe to this blog!

Drive Spiritedly.

-JRB

The Spirited Drive’s Day at a Local Car Show and Cruise-In

The Spirited Drive’s J. Potts, D. Fowler, and J. Hamlin had the opportunity to visit and cover the Spot Light Car Show in Wingo, KY. While there, they were invited to the Top Gun Cruise-In later that evening in nearby Mayfield, KY. They mingled with the car owners, made some new friends, and snapped some awesome photos.  Here is their story of the day’s events:

We arrived to the car show in Wingo, a small town in Graves County, Kentucky. A small crowd gathered at the event for not only the cars, but also the karaoke. It was a small show, but right off we could tell the owners were a close-knit community of people passionate about cars. Each owner had a special story about his or her vehicle, from the time it took to restore the vehicle to how he or she had owned something similar in the past. This show featured cars from all eras, from a 1936 Chevrolet to a 2000’s era Mustang. There were very few moments during this event that one of the three of us weren’t completely in awe of something.

At the car show, we were invited to a cruise-in which was sponsored by Top Gun, a local car show series in nearby Mayfield, Kentucky. We were stunned to be invited to an event we didn’t even know existed and to be so fully welcomed into the community so quickly. As the car show wound down, we packed up and made the quick trip to Mayfield. A little while after we arrived, the cars began to arrive in a continuous, steady stream. There was everything from a Model A Ford to a brand new Corvette. We took the opportunity to befriend even more car owners and hear more interesting stories of car passion and restoration.

This outing was a lot of fun, and I think we all left full of wonder and plans to get to work on some sort of restoration of our own. We’re grateful to the Graves County community and to Top Gun for putting these events together and for being so gracious to us while we were there. I think we’re all excited to come out next time and see what else Graves County has to show.

Article by J. Potts, Automotive Contributor; D. Fowler, Production Editor; J. Hamlin, Production Editor

Photographs by J. Potts, Automotive Contributor and D. Fowler, Production Editor

Photographs edited by J. Hamlin, Production Editor

Edited by JRB, Editor-in-Chief of The Spirited Drive